Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Migratory and subsequent generation-related damage patterns of Spodoptera frugiperda in corn plants in Jeju, South Korea.

Abstract

The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith), is a notorious invasive migratory pest native to the tropics that has recently invaded South Korea with subsequent damage to cornfields. This study was conducted to evaluate the damage patterns on corn plants caused by the migratory and subsequent generations of FAW. The early migrant generation-related infestation rates reached an average of 13.2%, ranging from a minimum of 4.3% ('Allog-i') to a maximum of 33.0% ('Chodang'), depending on the corn cultivar. The proportion of FAW larvae-infested corn plants, in which the FAW survived until the pupal stage was 19.3%. The subsequent FAW generation caused considerable damage to the ears, resulting in 60% of ears with damaged kernels. This damage was markedly different from the nearly negligible damage caused by the migratory generation. The FAW larval dispersion was the most dynamic during the second instar stage and occurred along the same cornrow in line. In addition, we discuss the development of corn pant damage patterns caused by FAW. In summary, the results of the present study would provide useful basic information for the damage analysis of this pest for future studies.