Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

New reports on Pseudopolydora (Annelida: Spionidae) from the east coast of Florida, including the non-native species P. paucibranchiata.

Abstract

Invasive alien species pose a threat to ecosystems and the native biodiversity they contain. Accordingly, potential or confirmed invasions require that non-native species are accurately identified and reported. Spionidae is one of the most diverse families of annelid worms, and a dominant group in terms of the number of species that have been introduced to non-native areas. Pseudopolydora is a genus of spionids for which most species are known from the Western Pacific. Collections around Fort Pierce, Florida resulted in identification of four Pseudopolydora species, including P. floridensis, P. achaeta, P. paucibranchiata, and P. rosebelae, with the last three representing new records for the Atlantic coast of North America. Specimens were identified based on morphological descriptions for this group, and the standard COI barcode region was sequenced. Introductions and subsequent invasions of marine worms such as spionids often go unrecognized and thus their ecological impacts understudied. Here, we call attention to non-native Pseudopolydora species so that their dispersal potentials and ecological consequences can be investigated.