Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Toxicity of rhizomes of the invasive Hedychium coronarium (Zingiberaceae) on aquatic species.

Abstract

The production and release of chemical compounds by invasive plants can affect competitors and native species overall, destabilizing ecological interactions and harming ecosystem functioning. Hedychium coronarium is an invasive macrophyte common on Brazilian riparian areas that produces a wide variety of allelochemicals, but little is known about their effect on aquatic species. Here, we identified the major chemical compounds of the aqueous extract of H. coronarium rhizomes and assessed its toxicity, evaluating the growth inhibition of one alga (Raphidocelis subcapitata) and one macrophyte (Lemna minor), and the lethality of cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia similis) and Chironomidae larvae (Chironomus sancticaroli). The majoritarian compounds of H. coronarium rhizomes were Coronarin D and Coronarin D Ethyl Ether. The aqueous extract was toxic for all tested species. We observed growth inhibition in R. subcapitata, as well as reduction in biomass in L. minor. Chironomus sancticaroli and cladoceran were the most sensible species. The aqueous extract of H. coronarium rhizomes was toxic on tested conditions, suggesting that the rhizome compounds may interfere on aquatic organisms and in the dynamic of trophic webs of aquatic ecosystems on invaded areas.