Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Allometric equations, biomass and carbon in tropical forest plantations in the coast of Jalisco.

Abstract

Estimation of the aerial biomass is a key tool to determine the carbon stock potential of a species. Tropical-species plantations have been established in western Mexico, but their content and distribution of biomass and carbon storage are unknown. In this study, the content and distribution of aerial biomass and carbon storage of the native species Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Tabebuia rosea, and the exotic species Gmelina arborea and Tectona grandis in 12-year plantations in the state of Jalisco were estimated. Also, the relation between aerial biomass and normal diameter was adjusted with linear, potential, and polynomial models. In the four species, most of the proportion of aerial biomass (58-67%) was found in the stem. The normal diameter was confirmed as a good predictor of total aerial biomass since two species were adjusted to potential models, and two were adjusted to polynomial models, with which it is possible to estimate aerial biomass fast, easily, and at lower cost than with the destructive method. T. grandis, G. arborea, and E. cyclocarpum were the species with the greatest biomass (161 kg ha-1, 134 kg ha-1 and 130 kg ha-1) and carbon storage potential (144.6 Mg ha-1, 120.8 Mg ha-1 and 117.5 Mg ha-1). Forest plantations with these species may contribute to long-term carbon sequestration and global warming mitigation.