Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Timing and order of different insecticide classes drive control of Drosophila suzukii; a modeling approach.

Abstract

The spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive pest causing significant damage to soft skinned fruits. Control of D. suzukii is critical since there is no tolerance for infested fruit in the market. While most insecticides control one or more D. suzukii life-stages (e.g., egg, larvae, and adult), the impact of insecticides that are toxic to immature stages is unclear on the subsequent generation of a field population. Insecticides were applied at field recommended rates on cherries and blueberries in the laboratory to determine immature D. suzukii mortality. Spinetoram, cyantraniliprole, malathion, methomyl, spinosad, and phosmet resulted in relatively high mortality of all immature life stages. Zeta-cypermethrin, cyclaniliprole, and fenpropathrin resulted in lower mortality of egg and all larval instars. Malathion was also applied to lowbush blueberries with different fruit sizes (small, medium, and large) in the laboratory and there was no statistical difference in mortality rates depending on fruit sizes. Mortality data from the laboratory experiments were used to parameterize a refined D. suzukii population model. The model revealed that the timing and order of different insecticide classes are important to control D. suzukii population. Model runs that included early applications of more effective insecticides resulted in high immature mortality and greater reduction of D. suzukii populations compared to treatments applied later.