Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Chemical control of Corythucha arcuata (say, 1832), an invasive alien species, in oak forests.

Abstract

In addition to the classic biotic and abiotic factors that have disrupted the health of forests throughout history, lately, the balance of forest ecosystems has been disturbed by different phenomena such as climate change, pollution, and, especially, biological invasions of invasive alien species. One of the alien species that has invaded Europe relatively quickly is an insect species of North American origin, the oak lace bug (Corythucha arcuata Say, 1832 Heteroptera: Tingidae). In the context of the rapid spread of infestations and the severity of attacks on oak trees in infested forests, this paper aims to assess measures to manage this species in the future. Namely, the effect of aerial chemical treatments on oak lace bug has been investigated with two influencing factors: the mode of insecticide action (contact and systemic) and the treatment volume (low volume and ultra-low volume). The experiment was conducted in two forests over a total area of 350 hectares. The results show that the reduction of the nymph population varied from 91% to 96%. However, the residual population was sufficient to allow differentiated re-infestations over time, more quickly after contact insecticide sprays (22 days after treatment) and slowly after systemic insecticide sprays (more than a month after treatment). This re-infestation time difference had implications on attack intensity as well, with stronger leaf discoloration observed in areas treated with a contact insecticide compared with those treated with a systemic insecticide.