Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Domestication does not alter invasion risk of a non-native legume.

Abstract

Most non-native domesticated plants provide benefits without escaping cultivation, but others have become prominent invaders. A better understanding of how domestication might alter plant traits that influence the ability of species to overcome barriers to invasion could improve invasion risk predictions. We explored how variation in foliar chemistry among cultivars of a widespread invader in the U.S. (Lespedeza cuneata) might influence invasion risk through differences in herbivore interactions and a potential tradeoff with competitive ability. In a no-choice feeding bioassay a generalist herbivore performed better when fed cultivars compared to wild genotypes and native congeners, suggesting domesticated L. cuneata may be more vulnerable to herbivory compared to wild genotypes. However, in a factorial greenhouse experiment, with treatments of herbivory and competition, all cultivars had similar seed and biomass production as the wild genotype. Competition with native species reduced productivity of all L. cuneata types, while experimental herbivory alone did not. We also found far less variation in foliar chemistry among L. cuneata types than expected based on domestication history. While our findings from the bioassay suggest potentially lower invasion risk for cultivars if herbivore populations expand more rapidly when feeding on cultivars, we did not find evidence that cultivars had different responses to herbivory or competition with native species in the greenhouse experiment. Altogether, the findings from our multi-pronged approach for evaluating potential factors underlying invasion success of a domesticated species indicate that domestication has not altered invasion risk of this widespread plant invader.