Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Olfactory cues from host- and non-host plant odor influence the behavioral responses of adult Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to visual cues.

Abstract

While trapping methods for Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) have typically relied on fermentation volatiles alone or in association with a visual stimulus, the relative contribution of visual and olfactory stimuli to the food- and host-seeking behavior of D. suzukii is poorly understood. This study quantified the type of response exhibited by male and female D. suzukii to color and the effects that volatiles (fermentation, fresh fruit, and leaf) exert on the outcome. Seven-, four- and two-choice assays were used to quantify interactions between visual and olfactory cues. When no volatiles were present in a seven-choice assay, D. suzukii preferred red, black, and green pigments. Black and red were preferred when yeast odors were present, and black alone was the most attractive color when blueberry odor was present. A strawberry leaf terpenoid, β-cyclocitral, seemed to have overridden the flies' response to color. In four-choice assays, blueberry odor was more likely to interact synergistically with color than yeast or β-cyclocitral. This study demonstrates that D. suzukii modulates the response to multimodal sensory modalities (vision and olfaction) depending, to some extent, on the type of olfactory stimuli. Our findings also provide insight into the relative importance of vision as a function of odor quality in this invasive species.