Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Chemical ecology of the Asian longhorn beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis.

Abstract

The Asian longhorn beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), is a destructive forest pest in its native range, East Asia, or a high-risk invasive species in many other parts of the world. Extensive research has been directed toward the development of ALB management strategies. However, semiochemical-based trap lures, which are one of the effective tools for detecting, monitoring, and potentially assisting in eradicating cerambycids, have not reached operational efficacy for ALB to date, which is probably due to a grossly incomplete understanding of its chemical ecology. Here, we summarize the current progress in ALB chemical ecology including host selection and location, pheromone identification, trapping techniques, olfactory system, and related biology and behavior. We also briefly review the known semiochemicals in the subfamily Lamiinae, particularly the ALB congener, A. chinensis. Based on this knowledge, we highlight a potentially important role of some host-original chemicals, such as sesquiterpenes, in ALB host and mate location, and emphasize the basic studies on the biology and behavior of adult ALB. Last, we formulate suggestions for further research directions that may contribute to a better understanding of ALB chemical ecology and improved lure efficacy.