Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Assessment of tolerance and resistance of inbred rice cultivars to combined infestations of rice water weevil and stemborers.

Abstract

Plants possess defense-related traits that both reduce injury from herbivores (resistance) and the amount of yield loss per unit injury (tolerance). Plant resistance and tolerance can be utilized in pest management programs. The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most destructive early-season pest of rice (Oryza sativa L., Poaceae) in the USA. Additionally, lepidopteran stemborers, particularly the invasive Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), are increasing in economic importance as pests of rice in Louisiana, USA. This study was conducted to evaluate both the resistance and tolerance of commonly grown inbred rice cultivars in Louisiana to combined infestations of rice water weevils and stemborers. Field experiments were established at the Rice Research Station in Crowley, LA, USA from 2017 to 2019. Eight commonly grown inbred cultivars were selected and pest infestation levels were manipulated using insecticidal seed treatments. The rice cultivar 'Jupiter' supported the highest numbers of immature rice water weevils, whereas weevil densities on other cultivars were intermediate. Low levels of stemborer injury were observed in 'Cheniere' and 'Jazzman-2', which suggests that these cultivars express some resistance to stemborers, whereas high stemborer injury was observed in 'Cocodrie, 'CL151', and 'Mermentau'. Together, rice water weevil and stemborer infestations negatively affected rice yields, with losses up to 18%. However, differences among cultivars in overall yield losses were minimal. Comparisons of slopes of yield Ă— weevil density relationships among cultivars revealed a greater decline, that is, yield loss per weevil, for Cheniere relative to Cocodrie. Our data suggest that plant resistance can serve as a valuable component of an integrated pest management program, particularly for stemborers.