Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Quo vadis? Historical distribution and impact of climate change on the worldwide distribution of the australasian fungus Clathrus archeri (phallales, Basidiomycota).

Abstract

Clathrus archeri is a fungus native to Australia and New Zealand that has started to expand into Europe, and it is considered a potentially invasive species. In this study, we examine the historical occurrence, current geographical range and potential future changes in the distribution of C. archeri using worldwide distribution data. Ecological modelling was used to assess the locations of the potential climatic niches of C. archeri within both its native and introduced ranges in the past, present and future. Our study clearly shows that the coverage of suitable habitats of this fungus has decreased since the last glacial maximum, and anthropogenic climate changes are accelerating the process of niche loss. The highest rate of C. archeri range contraction is expected in Australia, where the fungus should be considered a threatened species in the future. Highly valuable habitats will be available in Tasmania and New Zealand. However, a significant expansion rate of C. archeri will still probably be observed in Europe, where the climatic conditions preferred by the fungus will allow its quick expansion northeast into the continent.