Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Differing impacts of two major plant invaders on urban plant-dwelling spiders (Araneae) during flowering season.

Abstract

Plant invasions can have major impacts on ecosystems and influence global species diversity. In Central Europe, Himalayan balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) and American goldenrods (Solidago canadensis and S. gigantea) are important invaders often establishing dense and homogeneous stands, especially in urban and other disturbed habitats. We investigated their impacts on plant-dwelling spiders (abundance, family structure, guild structure) and potential spider prey items during flowering season within an urbanized landscape using a paired design comparing invaded and native reference vegetation plots. In general, flowering American goldenrods and Himalayan balsam had no significant impacts on the spider family composition. Invasion of American goldenrods further had no effect on total spider abundance and potential prey item abundance. In contrast, goldenrods showed a significantly increased crab spider (Thomisidae) abundance while being less inhabited by web builders. Himalayan balsam negatively influenced free hunters and running crab spider (Philodromidae) abundance, while we found no effects on other groups and total spider abundance. For Himalayan balsam, potential prey item abundance was higher than in native vegetation stands. Notwithstanding that our results only represent a snapshot of the system, they suggest that large-scale removal of urban goldenrod stands during flowering season might negatively influence local spider abundance, especially of crab spiders. Management efforts should therefore be accompanied by compensation measures to avoid disruptive effects on local plant-dwelling spider communities.