Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effect of herbicides on the management of the invasive weed Solanum rostratum dunal (Solanaceae).

Abstract

Solanum rostratum Dunal is an invasive weed species that invaded Israel in the 1950s. The weed appears in several germination flashes, from early spring until late summer. Recently, an increase in its distribution range was observed, alongside the identification of new populations in the northern part of Israel. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of herbicide application for the control of S. rostratum using two field populations originated from the Golan Heights and the Jezreel Valley. While minor differences in herbicide efficacy were recorded between populations, plant growth stage had a significant effect on herbicide response. Carfentrazone-ethyl was found to be highly effective in controlling plants at both early and late growth stages. Metribuzin, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen and tembutrione showed reduced efficacy when applied at later growth stage (8-9 cm height), as compared to the application at an early growth stage (4-5 cm height). Tank mixes of oxadiazon and oxyfluorfen with different concentrations of surfactant improved later growth stage plant control. Taken together, our study highlights several herbicides that can improve weed control and may be used as chemical solutions alongside diversified crop rotation options. Thus, they may aid in preventing the spread and further buildup of S. rostratum field populations.