Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Persistence of canine deciduous teeth in a little spotted cat (Leopardus guttulus.

Abstract

Dental malformations are common in wild mammals, however, they are poorly documented in the scientific literature. Knowledge of dental pathological conditions in free ranging species is fundamental for veterinary medicine, allowing the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. The objective of this study was to report the persistence of a deciduous canine tooth in a little spotted cat (Leopardus guttulus), donated by the Environmental Police to the Laboratory of Zoology of Centro Universitário Cesumar - UniCesumar, Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. The skull of a male was analyzed (face length: 2 cm; skull length: 6.3 cm; total length of the skull: 7.5 cm; face width: 4.5 cm; skull width: 5.3 cm). Observing the dentition and discrete fusions of cranial sutures, the age of the animal was estimated between six and seven months, considered a juvenile animal. The specimen showed persistence of the right and left deciduous canine teeth, located caudal to the permanent canines. Both mandibular deciduous canines presented a crack in the crown, which did not extend to the region of the dental root. The right and left maxillary deciduous and permanent canines occupied the same alveolus. The primary maxillary premolars were designed, but not the mandibular, as well as the maxillary and mandibular molars. Due to the lack of information about the age at which deciduous teeth exfoliate and the definitive ones erupt in L. guttulus and other Brazilian species, studies should be conducted on kittens kept in captivity, aiming to evaluate oral and dental pathologies and how they manifest themselves in wild cats.