Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Using molecular data to monitor the post-establishment evolution of the invasive skeleton shrimp Caprella scaura.

Abstract

The study aims to monitor the post-establishment success of the invasive skeleton shrimp Caprella scaura in the Atlantic-Mediterranean transition zone and understand its connectivity with other world areas, providing new information on the status of the introduced population and its global distribution. By using mitochondrial markers (16S and COI) we examined the temporal variation of populations in Cadiz Bay, Spain (hotspot for introductions in Europe) in between 2010 and 2017; as well as their linkage with foreign populations in its native and introduced distribution ranges. Cadiz Bay populations exhibited a connection with several European introduced populations (Iberian Peninsula, Canary Islands, Mediterranean Sea and The Netherlands), eastern USA, Sea of Japan and Australia. We found no evidence to support a Brazilian origin (one potential native area) of the Iberian Peninsula populations. We identified a progressive decrease in haplotype diversity and a low connectivity at the end of the monitoring period in one of the stations. Human-mediated changes in propagule pressure, and unfavorable environmental fluctuations are probably responsible for this. Meanwhile, populations in Cadiz Bay count on numerous foreign donors that could easily refuel the propagule input by exchanging gene flow. This implies that a vector regulation strategy has the potential of compromising the success of established non-native populations, which usually undergo vulnerability periods due to the challenging conditions of marinas. The use of molecular tools in a time series approach is then useful to identify the ideal time window to put in action management measures so that they are cost-effective.