Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Continued eastward spread of the invasive ambrosia beetle Cyclorhipidion bodoanum (Reitter, 1913) in Europe and its distribution in the world.

Abstract

Ambrosia beetles, including Cyclorhipidion bodoanum, are frequently introduced into new areas through the international trade of wood and wood products. Cyclorhipidion bodoanum is native to eastern Siberia, the Korean Peninsula, Northeast China, Southeast Asia, and Japan but has been introduced into North America, and Europe. In Europe, it was first discovered in 1960 in Alsace, France, from where it has slowly spread to the north, southeast, and east. In 2020, C. bodoanum was captured in an ethanol-baited insect trap in the Bohemian Massif in the western Czech Republic. The locality is covered by a forest of well-spaced oak trees of various ages, a typical habitat for this beetle. The capture of C. bodoanum in the Bohemian Massif, which is geographically isolated from the rest of Central Europe, confirms that the species is spreading east. The species probably spread naturally from Germany, but the period of establishment is difficult to estimate. Although the spread seems to be slow i.e. the beetle required about 60 years to spread from the borders of France and Switzerland to Bohemia, C. bodoanum may have spread more quickly but remained undetected in the newly invaded areas.