Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Temperature-dependent development and survival of an invasive genotype of wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella.

Abstract

Quantifying basic biological data, such as the effects of variable temperatures on development and survival, is crucial to predicting and monitoring population growth rates of pest species, many of which are highly invasive. One of the most globally important pests of cereals is the eriophyoid wheat curl mite (WCM), Aceria tosichella, which is the primary vector of several plant viruses. The aim of this study was to evaluate temperature-dependent development and survival of WCM at a wide range of constant temperatures in the laboratory (17-33°C). The development time of each stage depended significantly on temperature and it was negatively correlated with temperature increase. At high temperatures (27-33°C), individuals had shorter developmental times, with the shortest (6 days) at 33°C, whereas at the lowest tested temperatures (17-19°C), developmental time was almost 3× longer. Moreover, temperature had a clear effect on survival: the higher the temperature, the lower the survival rate. These data provide information promoting more efficient and effective manipulation of WCM laboratory colonies, and further our understanding of the ramifications of temperature change on WCM physiology and implications for the growth and spread of this globally invasive pest.