Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of rhizome extracts from invasive knotweed species fallopia japonica and f. ×bohemica on radish seed germination and root growth of seedlings.

Abstract

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) (Houtt.) Ronse Decr. and Bohemian knotweed (F. ×bohemica) (Chrtek and Chrtková) J. P. Bailey are invasive plants in Slovenia. We studied the effects of aqueous extracts [0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% and 10% (w/v)] from rhizomes of F. japonica and F. ×bohemica on the seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus) and examined the morphological and biochemical changes during germination and early growth of seedlings. Germination and early growth of radish were monitored 3, 5 and 7 days after treatment. Extracts of these two knotweed taxa delayed seed germination and strongly reduced the length of the primary root, but had less effect on shoot growth. These extracts triggered stress-induced morphogenic responses in the treated radish seedlings, stimulating the formation of lateral roots at low concentrations and causing inhibition at high concentrations. The extract concentration and not the knotweed taxon influenced the biochemical markers of oxidative stress in the radish. Total antioxidative capacity was increased in treated radish seedlings. The extract of F. japonica had a greater impact on the radish morphology than that of F. ×bohemica, with similar influences on the biochemical parameters. High pressure liquid chromatography identified emodin, resveratrol, catechin and epicatechin in the rhizomes of both knotweed species. Their contents were species dependent.