Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Field capture of male oriental fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in traps baited with solid dispensers containing varying amounts of methyl eugenol.

Abstract

Detection of invasive populations of Bactrocera dorsalis relies on traps baited with the male-specific attractant methyl eugenol. Standard protocol involves applying 5 mL of liquid methyl eugenol (1% naled) to a cotton wick, which is then placed inside a Jackson trap. Because of the lure's high volatility, the lure is replaced every 6 wk. Prolonging the lure's longevity would increase trap servicing intervals and reduce associated costs. Conducted at 2 sites in Hawaii, the present study investigated the performance of weathered solid dispensers containing 3, 6, or 10 g of methyl eugenol, deployed with solid insecticidal strips, relative to freshly baited liquid-bearing cotton wicks. At the cooler site, the solid lure/toxicant combination captured as many males as the fresh liquid formulation for as long as 12 wk. At the warmer site, the solid lure/toxicant system had shorter longevity, apparently owing to the reduced effectiveness of the insecticidal strip over time.