Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Parasitism and predation on sentinel egg masses of three stink bug species (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in native and exotic ornamental landscapes.

Abstract

This study evaluated parasitism and predation on sentinel egg masses of three stink bug species, the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Say), the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say), and the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), in ornamental landscapes composed of either native or exotic plants. This study also compared the species composition of parasitoids attacking two native stink bug species (P. maculiventris and E. servus) with those attacking the invasive BMSB on the same tree species in the same habitat. Overall, egg parasitism and predation were much higher on the two native stink bug species compared with BMSB, with an average parasitism rate of 20.6% for E. servus, 12.7% for P. maculiventris, and only 4.2% for H. halys and an average predation rate of 8.2% for E. servus,17.7% for P. maculiventris, and 2.3% for H. halys. Egg predation was also significantly higher on P. maculiventris than on E. servus eggs. Eight parasitoid species attacked sentinel stink bug eggs in the ornamental landscaped plots. Trissolcus euschisti (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) was the predominant parasitoid for all three stink bug species. There were no significant differences in parasitism and predation rates on any of the stink bug species between native and exotic plots. Therefore, there is no evidence that ornamental landscapes composed of native plants increased parasitism or predation rates of sentinel egg masses of two native stink bug species or the invasive BMSB, compared with those composed entirely of exotic plants.