Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Competitive interactions and partial displacement of Anastrepha obliqua by Ceratitis capitata in the occupation of host mangoes (Mangifera indica).

Abstract

We examined the competitive interactions between a native fruit fly species (Anastrepha obliqua Macquart) and the invasive medfly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann) when these co-occur on a shared mango fruit host (Mangifera indica L.). Using mango fruits of distinct levels of ripeness, we investigated both competition among larvae and among adult females for oviposition. We quantified competition by the numbers of eggs laid and the intensity of agonistic interactions between adult females. Interactions between immature fruit flies led to reduced size and number of emerged adults of both species. These impacts were felt more acutely in the native species. Interspecific competition between females led to fewer eggs laid on semi-ripe fruit by both species, which may be the result of niche overlap associated with oviposition. Intraspecific interactions between A. obliqua individuals led to intense agonistic behaviour, with a concurrent decrease in number of landings on these host fruits. These results suggest that the native species undergoes a partial niche displacement when facing the invasive species. A portion of the fundamental niche of A. obliqua remained unoccupied by the invading C. capitata, which may allow their coexistence under natural conditions.