Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

How do invasive trees impact shrub layer diversity and productivity in temperate forests?

Abstract

Key message: Invasive tree species alter taxonomic diversity and functioning of forest shrub layers: Prunus serotina increases shrub layer biomass two to three times but decreases its biodiversity, Robinia pseudoacacia slightly increases shrub layer biomass and has no effect on its biodiversity, while Quercus rubra both biomass and biodiversity of the shrub layer. Context: Although the impact of invasive trees on understory biodiversity is known, very little data exist about their influence on shrub layer biodiversity and productivity. Aims: To assess impacts of Prunus serotina Ehrh., Quercus rubra L., and Robinia pseudoacacia L. on shrub layer aboveground biomass, species composition, and alpha diversity. Methods: We measured stand structures in a set of 168 study plots established in Wielkopolski National Park (W Poland), and we compared biomass and diversity metrics using generalized mixed-effects linear models. Results: We found the lowest aboveground biomass of shrub layers in Q. rubra forests. P. sylvestris forests invaded by P. serotina had two to three times higher aboveground biomass than non-invaded forests. R. pseudoacacia forests had 27.8% higher shrub layer biomass than Quercus-Acer-Tilia forests. We found negative impacts of Q. rubra and negligible impacts of R. pseudoacacia on shrub layer alpha diversity metrics. However, the effect of Q. rubra was similar to native F. sylvatica. P. serotina negatively affected functional diversity, but its effects were lower in rich P. sylvestris forests than in poor P. sylvestris forests. Conclusion: The introduction of alien tree species alters ecosystem services and species diversity of shrub layers. The direction and magnitude of these alterations are alien species-specific and context-dependent. Therefore, their management should account for their impacts.