Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Interactive effect of climate warming and nitrogen deposition may shift the dynamics of native and invasive species.

Abstract

Aims: Projections of invasive species expansion under a warmer world often do not explicitly consider the concurring nitrogen (N) deposition. It remains largely unknown how the convoluted effect of climate warming and N deposition will shift the native and invasive species dynamics. Here, we hypothesize that the concurring increases in N and temperature would promote growth of invasive species greater than that of native species. Methods: A controlled greenhouse experiment was conducted to quantify the growth response of an invasive species (Solidago canadensis L.) and a co-existing native species (Artemisia argyi Levl. et Van) under the effects of climate warming, N deposition and their interactions. Important Findings: Due to the strong positive effect of N addition, the interactive effect of temperature increase and N addition resulted in an overall significant increase in growth of both invasive and native species, demonstrating that these manipulations may make microhabitats more favorable to plant growth. However, the relative increases in biomass, height and diameter of invasive S. canadensis were significantly lower than those of native A. argyi. This suggests that the vegetative growth superiority of invasive S. canadensis over the native species A. argyi is reduced by the enhanced N availability in the warmer world. Therefore, the inclusion of N deposition may mitigate the projection of invasive species S. canadensis expansion under climate warming.