Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Biological control of Halymorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in apple orchards versus corn fields and their adjacent woody habitats: high versus low pesticide-input agroecosystems.

Abstract

Halymorpha halys is an invasive pest in the USA that inflicts damage to specialty crops, and conventional growers have increased use of broad-spectrum insecticides to manage this pest. The impacts of pest management programs on natural enemies of H. halys were examined in high vs. low intensity insecticide input agroecosystems in western North Carolina (USA). Apple orchards and corn fields, with their adjacent wooded habitats, served as the high and low-input environments, respectively. Sentinel egg masses and yellow sticky cards were deployed in these agroecosystems to compare predation and parasitism on H. halys eggs, and presence, abundance, and richness of natural enemies. A total of approximately 85% of all sentinel eggs deployed in apple orchards in both 2018 and 2019 produced a healthy stink bug nymph, higher than all other habitats. A total of 26.6% and 32.9% of eggs deployed in wooded habitats bordering corn exhibited mortality due to natural enemy attack in 2018 and 2019, respectively. Comparatively, eggs deployed in apple borders had 10.0% and 17.8% of total eggs killed by natural enemies, in 2018 and 2019, respectively. Corn agroecosystems generally had greater predation and parasitism of sentinel eggs, and greater richness and abundance of predators detected on yellow sticky cards compared to apple agroecosystems. Wooded habitats bordering crops serve as population reservoirs for H. halys, allowing for egg laying and dispersal into crops. If these areas are protected as refuge areas free from insecticide drift, such as from apple orchards, they can also harbor thriving natural enemy populations that could reduce populations of H. halys. Wooded areas free from harsh broad-spectrum insecticides are an important component for successful conservation and augmentative biological control in neighboring crops.