Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Why did the invasive walking catfish cross the road? Terrestrial chemoreception described for the first time in a fish.

Abstract

Clarias batrachus (walking catfish) is an invasive species in Florida, renowned for its air-breathing and terrestrial locomotor capabilities. However, it is unknown how this species orients in terrestrial environments. Furthermore, while anecdotal life history information is widespread for this species in its nonnative range, little of this information exists in the literature. The goals of this study were to identify sensory modalities that C. batrachus use to orient on land, and to describe the natural history of this species in its nonnative range. Fish (n = 150) were collected from around Ruskin, FL, and housed in a greenhouse, where experiments took place. Individual catfish were placed in the center of a terrestrial arena and were exposed to nine treatments: two controls, L-alanine, quinine, allyl isothiocynate, sucrose, volatile hydrogen sulphide, pond water and aluminium foil. These fish exhibited significantly positive chemotaxis toward alanine and pond water, and negative chemotaxis away from volatile hydrogen sulphide, suggesting chemoreception - both through direct contact and through the air - is important to their terrestrial orientation. Additionally, 88 people from Florida wildlife-related Facebook groups who have personal observations of C. batrachus on land were interviewed for information regarding their terrestrial natural history. These data were combined with observations from 38 YouTube videos. C. batrachus appear to emerge most frequently during or just after heavy summer rains, particularly from stormwater drains in urban areas, where they may feed on terrestrial invertebrates. By better understanding the full life history of C. batrachus, we can improve management of this species.