Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Comparison of the ability to control water loss in the detached leaves of Wedelia trilobata, Wedelia chinensis, and their hybrid.

Abstract

In the process of biological invasion, hybridization between invasive species and native species is very common, which may lead to the formation of hybrids with a stronger adaptability. The hybrid of Wedelia trilobata (an alien invasive species) and Wedelia chinensis (an indigenous congener) has been found in South China. In our previous study, we found that the hybrid showed heterosis under cadmium stress. However, the results of this experiment demonstrated that the leaves of the hybrid had no heterosis in controlling water loss. The results showed that the water loss rate of W. trilobata was the slowest, that of W. chinensis was the fastest, and that of the hybrid was in the middle. Compared with W. chinensis and the hybrid, W. trilobata accumulated more abscisic acid (ABA) in leaves to control water loss. After the leaves were detached, W. chinensis leaves suffered the most serious damage, the lowest maximum photochemical efficiency, the most serious membrane lipid peroxidation, and the largest accumulation of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species. Compared with W. chinensis and its hybrid, the leaves of W. trilobata could accumulate more antioxidant enzymes and antioxidants, and the total antioxidant capacity was the strongest. The results demonstrate that the ability of the hybrid to reduce water loss was lower than that of W. trilobata, but higher than that of W. chinensis. They showed that the drought resistance of the hybrid may be higher than that of W. chinensis, and it might threaten the survival of W. chinensis.