Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Transcription-mediated tissue-specific lignification of vascular bundle causes trade-offs between growth and defence capacity during invasion of Solidago canadensis.

Abstract

Allocation of more resources to growth but less to defense causing growth vigor of invasive alien plant populations contributes to successful invasion. However, few studies has addressed to relationship between vascular development variation and this mechanism. In this study, a common garden experimentwas established to compare the growth and vascular bundle development between native and introduced populations of Solidago canadensis, which is a wide-distributed invasive species in China. Our results suggested that the rapid growth of introduced populations could be explained by the well-developed and highly lignified xylem; while native populations present more developed and highly lignified phloem, which contributed more resistance to the infection of Sclerotiun rofsii compared with introduced populations. This difference was resulted from tissue-specific tradeoff distribution of lignification related gene expression between xylem and phloem, which is regulated by upstream MYB transcription factors. Our study gives a novel insight of mechanism that explain invasion success: lignin-related gene transcription-mediated tissue-specific lignification of vascular bundle contributes tradeoffs in resource allocation between growth and defence capacity during successful invasion of S. canadensis.