Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Integrating management techniques to restore subtropical forests invaded by Hedychium coronarium J. Köenig (Zingiberaceae) in a biodiversity hotspot.

Abstract

The restoration of areas invaded by non-native plants is challenging as invasive plants may affect both biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, leading to impacts that constrain recolonization by native species after invaders are eliminated. In such a scenario, restoration techniques as topsoil transposition might accelerate colonization by native species in forests. Hedychium coronarium J. Koenig (Zingiberaceae) is a Himalayan herbaceous rhizomatous plant recognized as invasive in several countries. This study aimed to experimentally evaluate the response of plant assemblages to topsoil transposition on a site invaded by H. coronarium after chemical control. Four treatments were applied: chemical control integrated with topsoil transposition, chemical control of H. coronarium alone, topsoil transposition alone, and no intervention (control). Plots were evaluated prior to the application of treatments and then monthly for 11 months after treatments. Parameters were measured for H. coronarium (number of ramets, ramet height, and cover) and other species (species richness, abundance, and cover). Plots treated with chemical control (regardless of topsoil transposition) were similar in terms of all parameters measured and species composition, with dominance of herbs and shrubs. Plots managed solely with topsoil transposition had lower species richness, abundance, and cover, but more diverse life-forms, being equally rich in climbers, trees, and herbs. Chemical control was effective to control invasion by H. coronarium and increase species richness and abundance on the managed site. Topsoil transposition promoted colonization by species that might accelerate restoration.