Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Paspalum notatum (Bahia grass).

Abstract

Paspalum notatum is a perennial grass which is native to South America, and according to some authors native to Central America and the West Indies as well. It is widely naturalized in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate regions of the world where it has often been introduced to be used as a forage, for erosion control and as an ornamental and lawn grass. It is well adapted to a wide range of climates and soil types, including poor infertile soils. It spreads by seeds and vegetatively by stolons and rhizomes, and once established it grows forming dense mats of stolons, rhizomes and a thick root system that inhibit the growth and establishment of other plant species. It is very persistent and competitive, and tolerates drought, sporadic flooding, and continuous grazing; it has the potential to continue dominating pastures decades after abandonment (Violi, 2000; Cook et al., 2005; Useful Tropical Plants, 2018; Newman et al., 2014; Heuzé and Tran, 2016).