Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The economic challenges of dealing with citrus greening: the case of Florida.

Abstract

While pest management decisions are made at the farm level, a distinctive characteristic of the pest management of invasive species is its public-good nature. Here, we examine the challenges that a vector-disease pathosystem such as Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae)-citrus greening, creates for the adoption of prevention and collective management practices from an economic perspective. Those economic challenges originate from the choices and behavior of individual growers, which can impact not only their own payoff but also the choices, behavior and payoffs of other growers; influencing, for example, the spread of the disease, the vector population dynamics, and the adoption of proposed scientific solutions. While for most people the economics of invasive species is limited to calculating damage or control costs, economics is more than that. Economics can provide insights on the interactions between human behavior and natural processes, enabling a better understanding of the rationale of individual growers' choices, which are key for the design and implementation of effective public policies to deal with invasive pests and diseases.