Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Upscaling pest management from parks to countries: a New Zealand case study.

Abstract

Worldwide, introduced pest species create significant challenges to native biodiversity and individual health. New Zealand has an extensive history of attempting to protect biodiversity from introduced pests such as the Brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula [Diprotodontia: Phalangeridae]). Success has been achieved on a small scale, but the transition to the whole country management poses new issues. Therefore, this review uses the framework of 'Predator Free 2050' to summarize current practices and scrutinize new technologies. Importantly, we include a toxicology focus to the discussion, providing detail on the mechanism(s) of action that inform decisions regarding the pros and cons for the use of various chemical agents. Currently, the New Zealand government supports the use of sodium fluoroacetate (1080) for predator control on a mass scale, but this comes with a social opposition that is not always reflective of the underlying science. Understanding this controversy is vital if new strategies are to be deployed to achieve large-scale pest management. We use New Zealand as a case study in this area because its unique and isolated ecosystem provides a global opportunity for understanding new technologies and best practice.