Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Cats undergoing spay with medetomidine, ketamine and butorphanol develop arterial oxygen desaturation independent of surgical positioning and increased intraocular pressure in Trendelenburg position.

Abstract

This study observed the effects of three different surgical positions on arterial blood oxygenation measured noninvasively by pulse oximetry (SpO2) and on intraocular pressure (IOP) in anaesthetised cats undergoing spay. A total of 222 female feral cats were anaesthetised for a large-scale trap-neuter-return program with an intramuscular combination of medetomidine (0.03 - 0.05 mg/kg), ketamine (7 - 10 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg). Cats were randomly allocated to undergo spay in either Trendelenburg (70° downward head tilt), lateral or dorsal recumbency. SpO2 and pulse rate were measured at baseline, prior to surgical positioning, after one minute in surgical position and in one-minute intervals after surgical incision. Intraocular pressure was measured before positioning and at the end of surgery. At the end of surgery, all cats were placed into left lateral recumbency and all parameters were revaluated after five minutes. No significant differences between the three positions were found regarding SpO2, but an increase over time was observed. In total, 52 ± 10% (mean ± SD) of cats were hypoxaemic (SpO2 < 90%) at baseline. SpO2 improved over time, but 27 ± 3% (mean ± SD) of the cats remained hypoxaemic at the end of surgery. Trendelenburg position increased IOP during surgery (mean 31 ± 6 mmHg, individual max. 48 mmHg, versus 17 ± 4 mmHg in dorsal/lateral recumbency) but normalised after 5 mins in lateral recumbence. All cats recovered well from surgery and were released within 24 hours post-anaesthesia.