Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Exotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and native dark septate endophytes on the initial growth of Paspalum millegrana grass.

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytic fungi (DSE) promote increase in plant biomass, depending on the soil and climate conditions and the interactions with the host plant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction of exotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and native DSE fungi on the initial growth of P. millegrana. A completely randomized experimental design comprising the Paspallum millegrana cutilvar with the following treatments: control -without AMF, and three exotic AMF isolates (UFLA351 - Rhizoglomus clarum, UFLA372 - Claroideoglomus etunicatum and UFLA401 - Acaulospora morrowiae), with four replications each. P. millegrana grass was colonized by exotic AMF by R. clarum (UFLA351, 11.9%), C. etunicatum (UFLA372, 39.6%), and A. morrowiae (UFLA401, 51.2%). P. millegrana was also colonized by native DSE fungi, but these did not interfere with the colonization by exotic AMF and plant development. P. millegrana is responsive to the inoculation of UFLAs isolates of exotic AMF, which may contribute to the grass growth and survival under field conditions. The process of surface disinfestation of seeds does not eliminate endophytic microorganisms, whose presence may influence plant colonization by AMF, as well as development of the host plant.