Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Dispersal of the zoophytophagous predator Brontocoris tabidus and Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in an eucalyptus plantation.

Abstract

Forest plantations, especially eucalyptus, increase wood supply, avoid deforestation of native plants, and preserve local biodiversity. Defoliating caterpillars often reduce the productivity of these plantations. Rearing and releasing pentatomid predators is a strategy to manage these pests biologically. In this study, the predators Brontocoris tabidus (Signoret) and Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) (both Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) were evaluated in a clonal eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla Blake × Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden) (both Myrtaceae) plantation. Brontocoris tabidus dispersed further than P. nigrispinus over the 7-d trial. Males of both species dispersed more than females, and most P. nigrispinus were found within 10 m from the release point, whereas the majority of B. tabidus were observed between 15 and 30 m from their initial position of release.