Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Macroelements and trace elements in invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) from the Wieprza River (Southern Baltic): human health implications.

Abstract

Signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) is an invasive species displacing native European crayfish from their natural habitats. The elemental composition of the population from the southern Baltic coastal river and the potential health hazards are not known. The aim of the conducted research was to assess the quantitative content of Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn in meat, hepatopancreas, and exoskeleton in a population from Wieprza River (Poland) and compare the results with the recommendations of daily human consumption. Analysis also involved the composition of water and sediments. The concentrations of elements were analyzed using an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) of elements in the signal crayfish was much higher from water than from sediments. Bioaccumulation of elements differed between the particular parts of the body of crayfish, e.g., Ca showed extreme predominance in the exoskeleton, while in meat exhibited a predominance of K, Na, Ca, and Mg. Among trace elements, crayfish meat was the richest in Zn, Cu, and Fe. The concentrations of non-essential Cd, Pb, and As were low compared to other determined elements. The highest concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Se were found in the hepatopancreas, while the highest levels of Al and Pb were found in the exoskeleton. Generally, it was found that the meat of P. leniusculus can be a perfect supplement to the human diet, and the consumption of 100 g of meat per day did not exceed the dietary reference values for essential elements and also for Al, As, Cd, Ni, and Pb.