Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

First report of vascular wilt caused by Fusarium proliferatum on chickpea in Cuba.

Abstract

During the 2014-2015 harvest, field samples of wilting chickpea (C. arietinum) plants with chlorotic and necrotic roots were taken to the laboratory at the National Center for Animal and Plant Health, Mayabeque Province, Cuba. Samples of necrotic roots were surface-sterilised with sodium hypochlorite solution (1%), and ethanol solution (70%), rinsed three times with sterile water, air dried, and cultured on potato dextrose agar plus chloramphenicol (0.01 g/l) at 25±2°C for one week. Several fungal colonies were isolated, which were transferred to fresh PDA plates to obtain pure cultures. The aerial mycelium of all samples was initially white but became violet with age. Macroconidia were slender and to almost straight, with thin walls, apical cell curved, basal cell poorly developed and 3 to 5-septate. Microconidia were pyriform, 0-septate, found in false heads, with visible monophialides and polyphialides. Based on culture morphology, DNA sequence analyses and pathogenicity tests, the causal agent was identified as Fusarium proliferatum. This is thought to be the first report of F. proliferatum on C. arietinum in Cuba.