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Abstract

Fish community characteristics in the Gyeongan Stream, a tributary of the Han River Drainage System, Korea.

Abstract

This study surveyed Gyeongan Stream, a tributary of the Han River Drainage System, from April to October 2017 to investigate the characteristics of fish communities. The survey collected 40 species of 11 families from 48 survey stations using kick nets and cast nets. The dominant and subdominant species were Zacco platypus (48.0%) and Rhynchocypris oxycephalus (17.7%), respectively. The next most abundant species were Pungtungia herzi (6.8%), Z. koreanus (5.0%), Carassius auratus (4.3%), Squalidus gracilis majimae (2.7%), and Rhodeus notatus (2.5%). Among the fish collected, 14 species (35.0%) were Korean endemic species, and the exotic species were Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus, and Cyprinus carpio (Israeli type). The land-locked species were Plecoglossus altivelis, Rhinogobius brunneus, and Cottus koreanus, while the species sensitive to climate change was C. koreanus. The community analysis showed that the dominance was higher at the uppermost stream station, whereas diversity and abundance tended to be lower at the upstream station and higher toward the downstream station. The community structure was largely divided into rivers (uppermost stream, upstream, and middle-lower stream) and lake. The river health was mostly good (23 stations, 47.9%) and fair (15 stations, 31.3%). Comparison with past surveys showed that 12 species identified in the past surveys did not appear in this survey; nine species appeared for the first time in this survey; and the ecosystem disturbance species - M. salmoides and L. macrochirus - tended to spread more widely gradually.