Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Weeds in soybean vis-a-vis other crops under climate change - a review.

Abstract

Weeds possess wider genetic diversity than field crops. The changes within environment resources due to climate change, caused changes to the biology and competitive abilities of agricultural pests (weeds, insects and pathogen) relative to crops. Weeds with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways may exhibit differential responses to higher CO2 levels and temperatures, which can affect the dynamics of crop-weed competition. Weed competition can result in potential crop losses of 34 per cent globally. Weed population will change with climate change and risks of invasiveness may increase. Effectiveness of current management practices may be affected. Most of the research concentrated only on single factor either elevated (CO2 or temperature) therefore research is needed to assess the interactive effects of multiple climate change factors simultaneously to help prediction how weed problems may change in future with changing climate in order to develop flexible integrated weed management practices which are based on a foundation of knowledge of weed biology and ecology. Weeds have been winner and will be winner in future climate change conditions because of more adaptive power and more diversity. In this review, the most of the things illustrated very precisely.