Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

First report of anthracnose of peach (Prunus persica) caused by Colletotrichum fructicola in Korea.

Abstract

In July 2018, anthracnose of peach appeared in the peach orchards in Sangju, Korea. The typical anthracnose symptom (brown, circular, and necrotic lesions) was observed on the mature fruits. To isolate causative agents, diseased fruits were washed in tap water, and small sections of infected tissue were cut, disinfected by dipping in 1% NaOCl for 1 min, and then rinsed with sterile distilled water. After drying by blotting, the small sections of tissues were placed on water agar containing 35 g/liter of streptomycin. Pure cultures were obtained by transferring tips of newly emerging hyphae on to fresh potato dextrose agar. A 7-day-old culture (ICK18B4) was used for the identification of fungal species. Based on the results of morphological observations, multi-gene sequence analysis and pathogenicity tests, the causal agent was identified as Colletotrichum fructicola. This fungus was first isolated and described as the causal agent of coffee berry anthracnose. In Korea, it was reported as the responsible pathogen for apple anthracnose. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, C. acutatum and C. fioriniae have been recorded as the causal fungus of anthracnose of peach. This is thought to be the first report of anthracnose of peach caused by C. fructicola in south Korea.