Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The hybridization between Sphagneticola trilobata (L.) Pruski and Sphagneticola calendulacea (L.) Pruski improved the tolerance of hybrid to cadmium stress.

Abstract

Hybridization is common between invasive and native species and may be accompanied by invasive evolution. The hybrid of Sphagneticola trilobata (alien invasive species) and Sphagneticola calendulacea (indigenous congener) was found in South China. According to previous studies, the hybrid performed weak environmental adaptability in comparison with parents. However, based on the results from this study, the hybridization significantly improved the tolerance of the hybrid to cadmium (Cd) stress (200 μmol L-1). Under Cd stress, the hybrid lines showed lowest level of oxidative damage and the highest level of photosynthetic efficiency. Compared with the parents, the hybrid utilized more active detoxification strategies, such as the cell walls of the leaves and roots adsorbed 88% and 95% Cd, respectively, reducing the amount of Cd entering cells; moreover, most of the Cd that entered cells was transformed into less toxic chemical forms through the reduction of the highly toxic chemical forms; furthermore, it accumulated a large number of phytochelatins to bind Cd2+ and reduced the damage of organelles by Cd2+. The results demonstrate that hybridization between S. trilobata and S. calendulacea improved the adaptability of the new hybrid species to Cd stress and may pose a greater threat to the survival of the native parent species in the presence of serious water and soil pollution.