Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The evolution, gene expression profile, and secretion of digestive peptidases in Lepidoptera species.

Abstract

Serine peptidases (SPs) are responsible for most primary protein digestion in Lepidoptera species. An expansion of the number of genes encoding trypsin and chymotrypsin enzymes and the ability to upregulate the expression of some of these genes in response to peptidase inhibitor (PI) ingestion have been associated with the adaptation of Noctuidae moths to herbivory. To investigate whether these gene family expansion events are common to other Lepidoptera groups, we searched for all genes encoding putative trypsin and chymotrypsin enzymes in 23 publicly available genomes from this taxon. Phylogenetic analysis showed that several gene family expansion events may have occurred in the taxon's evolutionary history and that these events gave rise to a very diverse group of enzymes, including proteins lacking the canonical SP catalytic triad. The expression profile of these enzymes along the midgut and the secretion mechanisms by which these enzymes enter the luminal content were also analyzed in Spodoptera frugiperda larvae using RNA-seq and proteomics. These results support the proposal of a midgut countercurrent flux responsible for the direction of these proteins to the anterior portion of the midgut and show that these enzymes reach the midgut lumen via both exocytosis and microapocrine secretion mechanisms.