Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Bioefficiency of Chromolaena odorata (Linn.) on hematological and lipid profiles in sublethal cyanide poisoning in male wistar rats.

Abstract

Chromolaena odorata is an invasive plant which is acclaimed to have cyanide remediation potential from contaminated sites. This examination means to decide the impact of ethanol concentrates of C. odorata (ECO), sodium thiosulphate and a mix of both on hematological parameters and blood lipid profile of rodents presented to potassium cyanide. (KCN). A sum of thirty five male Wistar rats partitioned into seven groups of five units were used. KCN Group rats were administered with KCN alone. Rats in 100ECO, 150ECO, 200ECO groups were administered with 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg body weight of ECO respectively. Rats under Na2sS2O3 and Na2S2O3+ECO groups were administered 200 mg/kg sodium thiosulphate and sodium thiosulphate with ECO at 200 mg/kg respectively. The trial was done in about a month. Toward the finish of the investigation, the packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin level (Hb), Red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) were resolved utilizing known biochemical methodology. The outcomes demonstrated a noteworthy increment (p ˂ 0.05) in PCV, Hb, RBC and WBC level of remedial groups when contrasted with the cyanide group. Total cholesterol (TC), and tri-glyceride (TG) were altogether lower while HDL-cholesterol was fundamentally expanded in all the treated groups when contrasted and the untreated group given cyanide alone. However, no significant difference in LDL-cholesterol was indicated in all therapeutic groups compared with the cyanide group. The study revealed that C. odorata at the tested doses was able to improve the hematological parameters and lipid profile in cyanide exposed rats.