Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Development and field validation of a beta-cyfluthrin-based 'attract-and-kill' device for suppression of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) on residential citrus.

Abstract

An 'attract-and-kill' (AK) device was evaluated for suppression of adult Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), on residential citrus. The AK device, made from weather-resistant plasticized PVC, lured D. citri adults by simulating the color of citrus flush and killed them with beta-cyfluthrin. This study evaluated: (1) lethality of AK devices weathered up to 8 wk on residential citrus; (2) survival of psyllids caged with potted plants and AK devices; (3) psyllid suppression achieved by AK devices on individual dooryard trees. AK devices weathered for up to 8 wk remained lethal to psyllids. Greenhouse trials evaluated survival of adult psyllids caged for 4 d with orange jasmine plants that were: (1) treated with an (beta-cyfluthrin-infused) AK device; (2) treated with a blank (no insecticide) AK device; or (3) 'untreated' with no AK device. After 4 d, psyllid survival was on average 95% lower among adults exposed to plants with AK devices than adults exposed to untreated plants or plants with blank AK devices. Less than half of the adults exposed to plants with AK devices were alive after 1 d and nearly all were dead after 4 d. Deployment of 20 AK devices per tree provided significant psyllid suppression on infested lemon trees from winter to summer and reduced mean reproduction (cumulative eggs) by 91% and mean attack intensity (cumulative psyllid-days) of adults by 59% and nymphs by 53%. AK devices could be an effective control option for D. citri in urban areas.