Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Lymphovascular and perineural invasions are independently associated with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

Abstract

Background: Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and perineural invasion (PNI) are relatively common in various malignancies including colorectal cancers and have been shown to have prognostic significance. Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify the clinical and pathological variables associated with LVI and PNI in patients with colorectal carcinoma, who have been treated at Milad General Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Methods: The records of the patients with the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, who had undergone an operation at Milad General Hospital (Tehran, Iran) between 2012 and 2017, were reviewed. All patients, whose pathology reports and treatment records were available at Milad Hospital, were included. Relevant demographic, pathological, and surgical data, including age, gender, tumor location, maximum tumor size, pathologic Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) stage, and grade and number of removed lymph nodes were extracted from the medical records. Results: In total, 547 patients (374 cases of colon cancer and 173 cases of rectal cancer) enrolled in the study. The prevalence of LVI and PNI was 16.4% and 30.7%, respectively. LVI and PNI were found to be associated with higher tumor grade, higher T-stage, and higher overall stage. Conclusions: Colorectal carcinomas with positive LVI or PNI are more likely to have a higher grade, higher T-stage, and higher overall stage, and PNI is an independent factor for advanced disease.