Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Analysis and comparison of the frequency of pathological conditions and lesions in slaughtered animals in Poland in 2009 and 2017.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to analyze and compare the frequency of symptoms and pathological conditions in slaughtered animals in 2009 and 2017, and to determine the reasons behind their presence. The results of official post-mortem assessment of cattle, pigs and sheep carried out by the Veterinary Inspection were analyzed. When analyzing the causes of lesions or pathological symptoms and unfitness for consumption, the following conditions have been included: tuberculosis, actinomycosis, as well as quality deviations: emaciation and watery muscles, icterus, organoleptic changes, incomplete loss of blood, natural death, slaughter in agony, foci of pus, contamination and congestions, as well as other changes and parasitic invasions: cysticercosis, echinococcosis, fasciolosis and trichinellosis. It was found that the number of slaughtered animals exhibiting health condition deviations or symptoms and pathological changes remains at a high level in Poland, and it even demonstrates a slight increase in case of cattle. A large number of contamination and congestions indicates low attention to the conditions of ante-mortem trading in terms of slaughtered animals, as well as to hygiene and conditions for slaughtering, cutting and carcass processing. Quality deviations in the form of emaciation and watery muscles or incomplete loss of blood in slaughtered animals indicate mistakes made during breeding or when transporting the slaughtered animals. Having considered the foregoing, there may be justified concerns about the appropriate level of animal welfare. Parasitic diseases, especially fasciolosis in cattle and sheep, and echinococcosis in pigs in some areas require more effective actions to reduce them. On the other hand, a very small number of cases of trichinellosis in pig meat can be considered satisfactory.