Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Changes in gene expression and metabolite profiles in Platanus acerifolia leaves in response to feeding damage caused by Corythucha ciliata.

Abstract

The sycamore lace bug, Corythucha ciliata (Say) is a highly invasive pest insect that feeds on sycamore trees (Platanus spp.) worldwide. The interaction between Platanus species and this insect pest has not yet been studied at the molecular level. Therefore, a recent study was conducted to compare the gene expression and metabolite profiles of Platanus acerifolia leaves in response to C. ciliata feeding damage after 24 and 48 h. We employed high throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify a total of 2,828 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) after C. ciliata feeding. In addition, 303 unigenes were found to be up-regulated at both time points. Moreover, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis showed that monoterpenoid biosynthesis, the linoleic acid metabolism pathway, and alpha-linolenic acid metabolism were the most prominent pathways among the DEGs. Further analysis of the metabolite profiles showed that nine metabolites were significantly different before and after C. ciliata damage. In addition, we analyzed DEGs detected in the P. acerifolia and C. ciliata interaction using Mapman. The terpene synthase gene family was also identified. We suggest that the results obtained from DEGs and metabolite analysis can provide important information for the identification of genes involved in the P. acerifolia-C. ciliata interaction, which might be necessary for controlling C. ciliata efficiently.