Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Spatial and temporal dynamics of primary producers in shallow lakes as seen from space: intra-annual observations from Sentinel-2A.

Abstract

Under the current high anthropic pressure and climate change scenarios, a trend towards increasing changes in the trophic status of shallow lakes, and the development of opportunistic floating species is to be expected. This raises the need for monitoring and management actions to prevent widespread environmentally negative effects (e.g., anoxia). An efficient approach to monitoring water quality and primary producers in inland waters is to integrate in situ with remote sensing data. In this work, satellite multispectral data acquired by Sentinel-2 A are used to assess the intra-annual spatial and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton abundance, in terms of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and macrophyte Leaf Area Index (LAI) in a shallow eutrophic fluvial lake system (Mantua Lakes, Italy). Chl-a concentrations and LAI were derived from Sentinel-2 A data by applying a semi-empirical band ratio algorithm combined with a bio-optical model (BOMBER) for the former (Chl-a), and a semi-empirical model for the latter (LAI). These products were validated against in situ data (rRMSE=20% for both products; R2=0.93 for Chl-a; R2=0.83 for LAI). Phytoplankton maps showed a marked intra-annual spatial and temporal variability, generally revealing a Chl-a concentration gradient from lotic to lentic waters. Air temperature was the main driver of Chl-a concentration, followed by water discharge and precipitation. The macrophyte LAI followed aquatic plant growth seasonality, and was independent of the hydro-meteorological data. Allochthonous and invasive macrophyte species (such as Nelumbo nucifera and Ludwigia hexapetala) had higher LAI compared than the Mantua Lakes' autochthonous floating-leaved species (e.g., Trapa natans and Nuphar lutea). Maps of the abundance of primary producers can be used to follow the temporal and spatial evolution of different communities and support management actions, e.g., by identifying potential algal bloom hotspots, or the optimal timing for measures to control invasive species overgrowth.