Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effect of preinoculation with indigenous and introduced arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) on growth, biomass and biochemical contents of Albizia lebbeck Benth. seedlings in acid lateritic soil.

Abstract

Afforestation in most tropical soils is a real problem as those are not only P-deficient but also P-fixing. Acid lateritic soil is dry and deficient in essential nutrients and rich in Al and iron. Application of chemical fertilizer is of little use and expensive for plantation in this soil type. Nursery inoculation with selected arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, as phosphate biofertilizer may be a better option. Albizia lebbeck Benth is widely used as avenue tree roadsides and in tea and coffee plantations; and a good quality fodder. Inoculation of the tree seedlings in nursery with three indigenous AM-fungal isolates: Glomus aggregatum, Acaulospora delicata, Paraglomus occultum and one introduced Glomus mosseae enhanced growth within 60 days. At 240th day, maximum total biomass was enormously high (P<0.001); in treatments of G. aggregatum (140%), followed by A. delicata (135%), G. mosseae (134%) and Paraglomus occultum (121%). Shoot P content was also increased significantly (P<0.01) in all AMF treatments except in Paraglomus occultum (P<0.05) than control. Mycorrhizal dependency on G. aggregatum is maximum (58.3%), on A. delicata and G. mosseae was almost same (57.1-57.5%), least dependency on Paraglomus occultum (54.7%).