Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Changes in a fish community in a small river related to the appearance of the invasive topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva (Temminck & Schlegel, 1846).

Abstract

In recent years, the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva) has been one of the most invasive fishes in Europe. Pseudorasbora parva can potentially affect ecosystems, fish communities, and particular fish species. Electrofishing was carried out over a five-year period at three study sites in the Ciemięga River (eastern Poland) before and after P. parva had been found in the river. Changes in the occurrence, abundance, and density of native fish species after the appearance of the invader were determined. Changes in the species' richness were calculated, and correlations were estimated between the occurrence and density of P. parva and particular fish species and richness indices. The presence of P. parva has not affected the density of native species but coincides with a significant increase in estimated species richness and the total density of fish. There was a significant relationship between the presence of this invasive species and the fish community's composition, though the PERMANOVA result was unclear with regards to site-specific effects. Moreover, tench and bleak were associated positively, whereas Eurasian perch and sunbleak were associated negatively with the occurrence of P. parva. Pseudorasbora parva density was highly correlated with Cyprinidae density (excluding P. parva), species richness, and the Margalef diversity index. Thise study has shown that the presence of predatory fish in the river (Salmo trutta L.) may reduce the numbers of invasive P. parva.