Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Optimising fishery characteristics through control of an invasive species: strategies for redfin perch control in Lake Purrumbete, Australia.

Abstract

Invasive fish species can present difficult management problems, particularly when the species has recreational value. One such case is redfin perch in Lake Purrumbete, Australia, which have recreational value but have become invasive in the lake. In this study we evaluated removal strategies for redfin perch in Lake Purrumbete with the aim of improving the quality of the recreational fishery. We evaluated removal scenarios for redfin perch with a population model and conducted a sensitivity analysis to determine the robustness of our general results. The results suggest that removal scenarios that direct exploitation, on an annual time scale, at fish ≤150-mm total length, with high levels of exploitation, will result in the greatest reduction in small undesirable fish and the greatest increase in large desirable fish in the lake. This was consistent across most assumptions about life-history characteristics, density-dependent processes and population dynamics rates, suggesting that this management strategy is robust to most relevant biological uncertainties. Furthermore, exploiting redfin perch on an annual time scale would result in the lowest annual variation in the population because of disruption of the age and size structure. These results can help managers choose strategies to manipulate the fishery of Lake Purrumbete to achieve more desirable characteristics.